Waterproof vs. Breathability

Breathable outdoor clothing is most likely to get sweaty and wet inside when used in wet conditions. If the outer surface of the fabric retains even the thinnest film of water  (it becomes “wetted out”), the garment can lose as much as 70% of its breathability. If you are being energetic and sweating even a little bit,  you will then get condensation forming inside the garment and it feels claggy or wet.  To stop this from happening, the Durable Water Repellency (DWR) on the outer fabric of your clothing must be maintained and work properly. This will ensure that water droplets roll off the fabric immediately and the surface remains 100% breathable and the water vapour inside the garment can escape, leaving you dry.  All outer durable water repellency will eventually wear off and need to be renewed from time to time; one of the very best products for this is called “StormProof”.

Stormproof DWR water repellent spray
Stormproof DWR water repellent spray

The process is very simple and anyone can do it at home:  Wash the garment first and make sure all traces of detergent are rinsed off.  Stormproof is a water based liquid which can be sprayed on to the outside surface The bottle comes with a hand trigger spray gun attached. You can also brush it on with a sponge, or even completely immerse the garment in the liquid. Once you have covered the whole surface hang it up to dry.  If you can, tumble dry the garment as a little heat will improve the  repellency of the StormProof coating. I sometime use a hair drier if there is not a tumble drier handy.

I have tried Stormproof on many different fabrics and materials, such as cotton and nylon tents, Gortex clothing, fleeces, woven woollen jumpers and tweed hats to name just a few. Stormproof works well on them all.  I have even treated the wooden garden chairs so the rain water now runs straight off. No more soggy bottoms!!

 

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