Waterproof vs. Breathability

Breathable outdoor clothing is most likely to get sweaty and wet inside when used in wet conditions. If the outer surface of the fabric retains even the thinnest film of water  (it becomes “wetted out”), the garment can lose as much as 70% of its breathability. If you are being energetic and sweating even a little bit,  you will then get condensation forming inside the garment and it feels claggy or wet.  To stop this from happening, the Durable Water Repellency (DWR) on the outer fabric of your clothing must be maintained and work properly. This will ensure that water droplets roll off the fabric immediately and the surface remains 100% breathable and the water vapour inside the garment can escape, leaving you dry.  All outer durable water repellency will eventually wear off and need to be renewed from time to time; one of the very best products for this is called “StormProof”.

Stormproof DWR water repellent spray
Stormproof DWR water repellent spray

The process is very simple and anyone can do it at home:  Wash the garment first and make sure all traces of detergent are rinsed off.  Stormproof is a water based liquid which can be sprayed on to the outside surface The bottle comes with a hand trigger spray gun attached. You can also brush it on with a sponge, or even completely immerse the garment in the liquid. Once you have covered the whole surface hang it up to dry.  If you can, tumble dry the garment as a little heat will improve the  repellency of the StormProof coating. I sometime use a hair drier if there is not a tumble drier handy.

I have tried Stormproof on many different fabrics and materials, such as cotton and nylon tents, Gortex clothing, fleeces, woven woollen jumpers and tweed hats to name just a few. Stormproof works well on them all.  I have even treated the wooden garden chairs so the rain water now runs straight off. No more soggy bottoms!!

 

A top Stormsure tip – Fiddly jobs and precision gluing.

I was having a tinker in the shed the other day, decided to start doing bit of tidying/mending as you do…  Now my shed is an Aladdin’s cave of half made bird boxes, shelving, rubbish, old cloths and shoes, tool boxes and other random bits that are no longer wanted from the house.

The tidying I can put off for another day. So….I got the various bits needed to start the mend – Stormsure flexible repair adhesive, super glue, hammer and nails bit of duct tape for the proper bodges.

I found one of my old leather jackets, it was a much loved favourite of mine once upon a time. But now the stitching had come away, one of the sleeves had almost completely departed. This would be my first job of the day. I knew I needed the strength and weather resistance of the Stormsure but the precision of the Superglue pen I had to hand. (I didn’t think the hammer and nails would have been much use for this).

I wondered if the nozzle from the glue pen would work on my Stormsure tube….Before nozzle

Eureka..!      It fits.

After nozzle

 

 

 

 

 

Heres a close up of the stitching being glued.  The nozzle worked great, so much easier than a spreader. No mess on my new old jacket as the glue goes within a millimetre of where it needs to be. The glue does not gush out due to the small hole at the end. Best of all the air tight cap keeps the glue fresh without having to use the usual trick of having to keep it in the freezer.

Getting those hard to reach places.
Getting those hard to reach places.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Had mine out of the fridge for over 3 weeks now; I wouldn’t recommend doing this however because it does say on the packet to store in the fridge or freezer.

 

Lost Bung!

I was getting my inflatable boat towable ready for the summer (this is a large inflatable mattress that you can tow behind a speed boat) only to discover that the mice had been at it.  A couple of small holes in the PVC are going to spoil the fun.  A quick dollop of Stormsure Flexible Repair Adhesive have fixed them in no time.
Worse, however, is the fact that the bung is missing. I can inflate it with no problem, but I cannot keep the air in! The bung has an unusual thread which tapers as it goes in. I have looked on line but found nothing.

Missing Bung
Missing Bung

So , I have made a new bung. I used StormForm. This is a hot water mouldable polymer. It comes in granule form. I put about 25 grams in a cup and covered it with boiling water.

 

 

 

StormForm
StormForm

After a few seconds it all melts into a thick flexible plastic. Then, with my hands I have moulded this into the rough shape of a bung. Of course it did not fit, but by remelting the StormForm and screwing the bung into the hole, I have managed to make a perfect screw thread.

 

After about 10 minutes I have an airtight bung again.

Success!

Hand Made bung
Hand Made bung

Solowheel – a transport revolution.

This year is the time for a transport revolution. I came across a great new invention, bought one and have been using it daily since September. This amazing item is called a Solowheel.

Solowheel looks unusual. It is a one wheeled personal electric vehicle. It is not much larger than a brief case. It weighs 10Kgs and the wheel is the ONLY moving part.
Whilst it looks impossible to use (as it has only one wheel) it actually took me about 20 minutes to learn how to use it. Once learnt – never forgotten, rather like riding a bicycle…


Solowheel is the ideal method of getting from A to B when the distance is a bit more than you want to, or have time to, walk. I use it to go to the village shop which is one and a half miles away. I also use it for getting around town.I park on the edge of town and then take the Solowheel in for the last mile; it means I no longer pay Cambridge’s extortionate parking fees, which can be nearly £10 for a couple of hours.

Solowheel is great for commuters too. It can be carried onto a bus, train or aeroplane and used at both ends of the journey. It will take you up to 10 miles on a single charge and takes from 45 minutes to 1 hour to fully recharge the battery.
Solowheel actually goes up quite steep hills. I rode mine straight up Park Row in Bristol. but the range will reduce if you go up hill all the time. However it does recharge the battery when you are going down hill again!

Solo wheel Limited will start distributing Solowheels this year, so get in touch if you want to know more.

Watch the video!

You will find out more on
http://www.solowheel.uk.com

Kite Surf Ripper

Watersport Repair Kit
Watersport Repair Kit

Fixing a rip in the nylon canopy of a kite is easy using a STORMSURE TUFF Tape patch. Simply stick the patch over the rip and press firmly. Any time a surf kite is on the ground there is a chance that you can catch the nylon on something sharp like a stone, twig or piece of wire.

TUFF Tape is ideal for sails, kites and inflatable bladders. It is brilliant stuff! It is made of thin film polyurethane with a self adhesive backing. Peel off the paper, and carefully place the patch onto the fabric. You need to avoid creases and fold/bubbles in the patch if at all possible.

Guaranteed to get you back on the water in seconds.

Use TUFF Tape for and instant fix on simple rips on nylon fabric and cuts and leaks in the inflatable bladders. If you have burst the  bladder at the seams you need to use the Stormsure Flexible Repair Adhesive glue.

You can use the small Kite and Surf Repair Kit (RRP £5.50) or the larger Water Sports Repair Kits (RRP £9.99)  There is enough material in the larger kit to mend your wetsuit, wellies and boat cover too. In fact, it will stick to so many things; I have patched both wetsuits, airbeds, hiking trousers and cracked plastic buckets with it.

 

Cycling to the Pub tonight?

I bought a new bicycle recently, with the aim of taking a bit of serious exercise. The bike design is great for the most part, but I noticed that there is not enough room on the handle bars to place the fittings for a front light. Also the seat fitting/position is not suitable for the rear light either, as it interferes with the mudguard fitting. Even the  struts down to the rear wheel are not cylindrical but tapering triangular sections, so they do not work with the rear light fittings.
My plans to cycle with some friends to a pub one evening and come back in the dark are being thwarted!
However, I have used some StormForm (our new product) and a bit of ingenuity, and fixed both front and rear LED lights onto my helmet.

StormForm is polymer which can be melted in hot water and moulded to almost any shape, and it then cools into a hard white plastic. It sticks really well to the plastic on the helmet and and after a few rides shows no sign of coming off.

StormForm is THE MOST USEFUL PRODUCT I have come across for ages!

So I should be visible coming back after dark this week end.  Does anyone want to try it out?

You can get  StormForm in a box of 70g and  250ml and 1 litre  tins  from www.stormsure.com

 

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